David Osmond

David has been compensated by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation for his time and efforts as a spokesperson for this campaign.

Our Voice In Song – A Campaign To Raise Awareness About Relapsing MS

Music artist, singer and songwriter David Osmond was diagnosed with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) at the age of 26. Since that time, David has become a vocal advocate for the MS community, sharing his experiences and his music, to help raise awareness of this condition. Read David’s story.

"Music motivates people and song conveys my feelings in ways that words alone cannot," explained David, a member of the iconic musical Osmond family. "I wrote 'I Can Do This' to inspire people with relapsing MS to do more than simply cope with the disease, and not let their MS define them. The language of music is universal and I hope that listeners share the song so its message may encourage people to draw upon their own inner strength to meet life's challenges head-on."

Music artist, singer and songwriter David Osmond was diagnosed with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) at the age of 26. Since that time, David has become a vocal advocate for the MS community, sharing his experiences and his music, to help raise awareness of this condition. show more

"Music motivates people and song conveys my feelings in ways that words alone cannot," explained David, a member of the iconic musical Osmond family. "I wrote 'I Can Do This' to inspire people with relapsing MS to do more than simply cope with the disease, and not let their MS define them. The language of music is universal and I hope that listeners share the song so its message may encourage people to draw upon their own inner strength to meet life's challenges head-on." show less

Watch the video of David performing his inspiring song, "I Can Do This", and download your own copy of the track.

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CREATE YOUR ORANGEMOJI and help raise awareness. Personalize an orange to show your "I Can Do This" attitude. SHARE IT.

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Tips for living with relapsing MS. READ MORE.

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Download your own copy of "I Can Do This". GET IT NOW.

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Get information about a treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis. LEARN MORE.

Important Safety Information gpr@outcome.com www.gilenyapregnancyregistry.com www.fda.gov/medwatch Back to Top

Important Safety Information

Indication

GILENYA is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. GILENYA can decrease the number of MS flare-ups (relapses). GILENYA does not cure MS, but it can help slow down the physical problems that MS causes.

Important Safety Information

You should not take GILENYA if in the last 6 months you experienced heart attack, unstable angina, stroke or warning stroke, or certain types of heart failure. Do not take GILENYA if you have an irregular or abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia), including a heart finding called prolonged QT as seen on an ECG, or if you take medicines that change your heart rhythm. Do not take GILENYA if you are allergic to fingolimod or any of the other ingredients.

GILENYA may cause serious side effects such as:

  • Slow heart rate, especially after first dose. You will be monitored by a health care professional for at least 6 hours after your first dose. Your pulse and blood pressure will be checked hourly. You'll get an ECG before and 6 hours after your first dose. If any heart problems arise or your heart rate is still low, you'll continue to be monitored. If you have any serious side effects, especially those that require treatment with other medicines, or if you have certain types of heart problems, or if you're taking medicines that can affect your heart, you'll be watched overnight. If you experience slow heart rate, it will usually return to normal within 1 month. Call your doctor, or seek immediate medical attention if you have any symptoms of slow heart rate, such as feeling dizzy or tired or feeling like your heart is beating slowly or skipping beats. Symptoms can happen up to 24 hours after the first dose. Do not stop taking GILENYA without consulting with your doctor. Call your doctor if you miss 1 or more doses of GILENYA—you may need to repeat the 6-hour monitoring.
  • Increased risk of serious infections. GILENYA lowers the number of white blood cells (lymphocytes) in your blood. This will usually go back to normal within 2 months of stopping GILENYA. Your doctor may do a blood test before you start GILENYA. GILENYA may decrease the way vaccines work in your body, especially the chicken pox vaccine. Increased risk of infection was seen with doses higher than the approved dose (0.5 mg). Two patients died who took higher-dose GILENYA (1.25 mg) combined with high-dose steroids. Call your doctor right away if you have fever, tiredness, body aches, chills, nausea, vomiting, or headache accompanied by fever, neck stiffness, sensitivity to light, nausea, and/or confusion. These may be symptoms of meningitis.
  • Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a rare brain infection that usually leads to death or severe disability. If PML happens, it usually happens in people with weakened immune systems. It is important that you call your doctor right away if you have any new or worsening medical problems that have lasted several days, including problems with thinking, eyesight, strength, balance, weakness on 1 side of your body, or using your arms and legs.
  • Macular edema, a vision problem that can cause some of the same vision symptoms as an MS attack (optic neuritis), or no symptoms. If it happens, macular edema usually starts in the first 3 to 4 months after starting GILENYA. Your doctor should test your vision before you start GILENYA; 3 to 4 months after you start GILENYA; and any time you notice vision changes. Vision problems may continue after macular edema has gone away. Your risk of macular edema may be higher if you have diabetes or have had an inflammation of your eye (uveitis). Call your doctor right away if you have blurriness, shadows, or a blind spot in the center of your vision; sensitivity to light; or unusually colored vision.
  • Swelling and narrowing of the blood vessels in your brain. A condition called PRES (Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome) has occurred rarely in patients taking GILENYA. Symptoms of PRES usually get better when you stop taking GILENYA. However, if left untreated, it may lead to a stroke. Call your doctor right away if you experience any symptoms, such as sudden headache, confusion, seizures, loss of vision, or weakness.
  • Breathing problems. Some patients have shortness of breath. Call your doctor right away if you have trouble breathing.
  • Liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to check your liver before you start GILENYA. Call your doctor right away if you have nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, tiredness, dark urine, or if your skin or the whites of your eyes turn yellow.
  • Increases in blood pressure (BP). BP should be monitored during treatment.
  • A type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Talk to your doctor if you notice any skin nodules (shiny, pearly nodules), patches or open sores that do not heal within weeks. These may be signs of BCC.

GILENYA may harm your unborn baby. Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Women who can become pregnant should use effective birth control while on GILENYA, and for at least 2 months after stopping. If you become pregnant while taking GILENYA, or within 2 months after stopping, tell your doctor right away. Women who take GILENYA should not breastfeed, as it is not known if GILENYA passes into breast milk. A pregnancy registry is available for women who become pregnant during GILENYA treatment. For more information, contact the GILENYA Pregnancy Registry by calling Quintiles at 1-877-598-7237, by e-mailing gpr@quintiles.com, or by going to www.gilenyapregnancyregistry.com.

Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you had or now have an irregular or abnormal heartbeat; heart problems; a history of repeated fainting; a fever or infection, or if you are unable to fight infections due to a disease or are taking medicines that lower your immune system, including corticosteroids, or have taken them in the past; eye problems; diabetes; breathing or liver problems; or uncontrolled high blood pressure. Also tell your doctor if you have had chicken pox or have received the chicken pox vaccine. Your doctor may test for the chicken pox virus, and you may need to get the full course of the chicken pox vaccine and wait 1 month before starting GILENYA.

If you take too much GILENYA, call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take or have recently taken, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you have been vaccinated within 1 month before you start taking GILENYA. You should not get certain vaccines, called live attenuated vaccines, while taking GILENYA and for at least 2 months after stopping GILENYA treatment.

The most common side effects with GILENYA were headache, abnormal liver tests, diarrhea, cough, flu, sinusitis, back pain, abdominal pain, and pain in arms or legs.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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